Benjamin Greenleaf, National Arithmetic, 1835  

The following excerpt is from the book The National Arithmetic on the Inductive System; Combining the Analytic and Synthetic Methods by Benjamin Greenleaf, published in 1852, with a preface dated 1847 saying that ""The National Arithmetic has now been before the public ror nearly twelve years.

The portion quoted here concerns the "Chuquet" number-names.

This book was referenced by W. D. Henkle in Names of the Periods in Numeration, 1860.


NUMERATION TABLE

  The following is the French method of enumeration, and is in general use in the United States and on the continent of Europe.

In order to enumerate any number of figures by this method, they should be separated by commas into divisions of three figures each, as in the annexed table. Each division will be known by a different name. The first three figures, reckoning from the right to left, will be so many units, tens, and hundreds, and the next three so many thousands, and the next three so many millions, &c.

Vigintillions.
Novemdecillions.
Octodecillions.
Septendecillions.
Sexdecillions.
Quindecillions.
Quatuordecillions.
Tredecillions.
Duodecillions.
Undecillions.
Decillions.
Nonillions.
Octillions.
Septillions.
Sextillions.
Quintillions.
Quadrillions.
Trillions.
Billions.
Millions.
Thousands.
Units.

  The value of the numbers in the annexed table, expressed in words, is One hundred twenty-three vigintillions, four hundred fifty-six novemdecillions, seven hundred eighty-nine octodecillions, one hundred twenty-three septendecillions, four hundred fifty-six sexdecillions, seven hundred eighty-nine quindecillions, one hundred twenty-three quatuordecillions,four hundred fifty-six tredecillions, seven hundred eighty-nine duodecillions, one hundred twenty-three undecillions, four hundred fifty-six decillions, seven hundred eighty-nine nonillions, one hundred twenty-three octillions, four hundred fifty-six septillions, seven hundred eighty-nine sextillions, one hundred twenty-three quintillions, four hundred fifty-six quadrillions, seven hundred eighty-nine trillions, one hundred twenty-three billions, four hundred fifty-six millions, seven hundred eighty-nine thousands, one hundred twenty-three units.

Thousands.
Tredecillions.
Thousands.
Duodecillions.
Thousands.
Undecillions.
Thousands.
Decillions.
Thousands.
Nonillions.
Thousands.
Octillions.
Thousands.
Septillions.
Thousands.
Sextillions.
Thousands.
Quintillions.
Thousands.
Quadrillions.
Thousands.
Trillions.
Thousands.
Billions.
Thousands.
Millions.
Thousands.
Units.

  The followig is in the old English method of enumeration, but it has become almost obsolete in this country. In order to enumerate any number of figures by this method, they should be separated by semicolons into divisions of six figures each, and each division separated in the middle by a comma, as in the annexed table. Each division will be known by a different name. The first three figures, in each division, reckoning from right to left, will be so many units, tens, and hundreds of the name belonging to the division, and the three on the left will be so many thousands of the same name. The value of the numbers in the annexed table, expressed in words, is Three hundred and seventeen thousand, eight hundred and ninety-seven tredecillions; four hundred and thirty-one thousand, thirty-two duodecillions; six hundred thirty-nine thousand, eight hundred sixty-four undecillions; three hundred sixty-one thousand, three hundred sixteen dccillions; four hundred sixty-one thousand, three hundred fifteen nonillions; one hundred twenty-three thousand, six hundred seventy-five octillions; eight hundred sixteen thousand, one hundred thirty-one septillions; one hundred twenty-three thousand, four hundred fifty-six sextillions; one hundred twenty-three thousand, six hundred fourteen quintillions; three hundred fifteen thousand, one hundred thirty-one quadrillions; three hundred ninety-eight thousand, eight hundred thirty-two trillions; five hundred sixty-three thousand, eight hundred seventy-one billions; three hundred fifty-one thousand, six hundred fifteen millions; one hundred twenty-three thousand five hundred sixty-one.

  NOTE. — The student must be familiar with the names, from units to tredecillions, and from tredecillions to units, so that he may repeat them with facility either way.

Let the following numbers be written in words: —

,------------------------- --------------. 706 - 313,461 - 604,021 - 3,607,005 - 607,081,107 - 470,803,020 - 7,801,410,909 - 322,172,517,101 - 607,100,001,070 - 407,000,010,703,801 - 200,070,007,801,000 - 670,812,000,170,063,891 - 478,127,815,016,666,060,707 - 800,800,800,800,800,800,800,800 - 127,081,061,071,081,010,009,007,007 - 407,144,140,070,060,700,007,101,800,808
------------------------- --------------'

Let the following numbers be written in figures: * —

1. Twnty-nine.

2. Four hundred and seven.

3. Twenty-three thousand and seven.

4. Five millions and twenty-seven.

5. Seven millions, two hundred five thousand and five.

6. Two billions, two hundred seven millions, six hundred four thousand and nine.

7. One hundred five billions, nine hundred nine millions, three hundred eight thousand two hundred and one.

8. Nine quintillions, eight billions and forty-six.

9. Fifteen quintillions, thirty one millions and seventeen.

10. Five hundred seven septillions, two hundred three trillions, fifty-seven millions and eighteen.

11. Nine nonillions, forty-seven trillions, seven billions, two millions, three hundred ninety-two.

12. Fifteen duodecillions, ten trillions, one hundred twenty-seven billions, twenty-six millions, three hundred twenty thousand four hundred twenty-six.

* To express numbers by figures, begin at the left hand with the highest order mentioned, and, proceeding to units, write in each successive order the figure which denotes the given number in that order. If any of the intervening orders are not mentioned in the given number, supply their places with ciphers.


Source

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